Rakow Grant for Glass Research

Rakow Research Grant

The Corning Museum of Glass sponsors the Rakow Grant for Glass Research, which makes available one or more annual awards totaling up to $25,000. The program is made possible through the generosity of the late Dr. and Mrs. Leonard S. Rakow, who were Fellows, friends, and benefactors of the Museum. The purpose of this grant is to foster scholarly research in the history of glass and glassmaking from antiquity until the mid-20th century, from anywhere in the world. Disciplines intersecting with glass research may include (and are not limited to) archaeology and anthropology, art history, conservation, and the history of science and technology.  

Eligibility

Individuals and institutions may apply. There are no national residency requirements, and the results of the research may be reported in any language, but preference may be given to projects which will bring researchers to Corning to study the Museum's collections or to use the Rakow Research Library. Preference will be given to projects which will be completed with the funding available, rather than to projects which will only be advanced by this grant. Projects which are a portion of a larger program, and which are already being funded by others, are unlikely to receive the award.

To summarize: The judges are looking for a project which will lead to a finished product within the funding limits and whose research will bring the recipient to Corning. Other factors that can contribute to a successful application include originality of research questions and clarity of methodology.

Description

Grants may be used to cover travel, living expenses, or other expenditures necessary to conduct the research or to publish it. Awards will be based on the merit of the projects proposed, the nature and extent of the contributions to glass studies, and an evaluation of the ability of the applicant to accomplish the goals as stated. Applications will be considered only if typed in English on the prescribed form below. Resubmissions of previously unsuccessful applications can be received. Please indicate if your application is a resubmission or a modification of a prior application, and in which year you last submitted your application.

How to Apply

Applications, which are reviewed by a Museum staff committee, must be received before February 1 of the year for which funding is requested. Notification of the committee's decision will be sent by April 1. Successful applicants will normally receive all of the approved funds at the beginning of the project. In the event that full funding of a project cannot be given, the applicant will be contacted immediately to determine if the project can be modified.

Applicants must certify that they will expend any funds granted in accordance with the project outlines, and that the Museum will be informed of any other grants that are awarded in support of this project. Any major changes in plans made after the awarding of a grant require the prior written consent of the Museum. A brief written report documenting the results of the project is required for publication in the Journal of Glass Studies within the Notes sections, due on February 28 of the following year that the grant was awarded. A summary of how the grant funds were expended is also required. Unspent funds must be returned to the Museum. Successful applicants may be approached to submit or edit a short version of their research report and a related image for the Museum's magazine, The Gather. We also request that any future publication or presentation of the research conducted as part of the Rakow Research Grant acknowledges the award and the Corning Museum of Glass. Award recipients are encouraged to provide offprints, copies of articles or publications, and/or notification of publications resulting from the Rakow Research Grant to the Rakow Research Library.

Questions? Contact curatorial@cmog.org.

We are no longer accepting applications for 2017 grants.

Past Grant Recipients

2017

Dr. Abidemi Babalola is working on the re-excavation of a glassmaking site in Ile-Ife, located in southwestern Nigeria, the first known glassmaking center in sub-Saharan Africa, dating to the 11th through 15th centuries. The goals of the project are to understand the technological processes...

Dr. Julian Henderson is studying the technology and provenance of glass cylinders from Chogha Zanbil, Iran, which were used to make decorative panels on doors at the ziggurat there. Chemical and isotopic techniques will be employed to determine the origin of the glass, whose corrosion and...

2016

Charlotte Holzer was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research to conduct research for her dissertation on the history and conservation of handmade glass fibers. The project deals with the cleaning of historical fibers in museum objects. For a case study, she will focus on the glass-fiber dress made...

Melina Smirniou was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. The subject of her research is glass associated with the Silk Road, a network of routes linking various East and West cultures and civilizations for over 2,000 years. Her project concerns the role of glass at Otrar, which she describes...

2015

Šárka Jonášová, a student at the Institute of Geology, Czech Academy of Sciences, in Prague, was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. She is conducting an archaeometric survey of luxury and utilitarian glasses found in a cesspit at Salm palace in Prague. The finds themselves are well...

Victoria Sainsbury was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. At the time of the award, she was pursuing her doctorate in archaeological science at the University of Oxford (U.K.), and was working on her dissertation on changes in glass sourcing in Britain during the Late Roman and early Anglo-...

Karli Wurzelbacher, a specialist in the history of 20th-century American art at the University of Delaware in Newark, was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. Wurzelbacher earned her master's degree in art history from Hunter College, City University of New York, and bachelor's degrees in art...

2014

Anna Hodgkinson, a resident of Berlin and a recent Ph.D. recipient from University of Liverpool, U.K. has been awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. Dr. Hodgkinson, who has worked at a number of sites in Egypt, will apply her share of the Rakow Grant to a project involving the...

Alessandro Sebastiani, a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Sheffield, U.K. has been awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research. As part of his fellowship, Dr. Sebastiani is directing major Roman excavations in the area of Alberese, near...

2013

Dr. Souen Fontaine of the Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS-Aix-Marseille University) in France was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research to study 4,000 archeological glass fragments uncovered in the 2011 underwater excavation of the Arles-Rhone 3 wreck and surrounding port dumps. Research included...

Dr. Rainer Richter of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden was awarded a Rakow Grant for Glass Research to research the stylistic differentiation between the Baroque glass engravings of Caspar Lehmann and of Georg and Heinrich Schwanhardts from Prague and Nuremberg in the late 16th to 17th...

2012

Margherita Ferri of Ca’ Foscari University of Venice was awarded a 2012 Rakow Grant for Glass Research. Dr. Ferri’s research begins with the glass unearthed at Stari Bar, a key site in Montenegro, by a team of archaeologists from Ca’ Foscari University in Venice.  These finds will be compared...

Yi-Xian Lin, a Newton International Fellow at the Institute of Archaeology of University College London, was awarded a 2012 Rakow Grant for Glass Research. Dr. Lin is completing a postdoctoral research project on the earliest pigments (Chinese Blue and Purple) and mixed-alkaline glassy faience...

2011

Laure Dussubieux, manager of the LA-ICP-MS Laboratory at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, is studying glass beads made and used in Europe in the post-medieval period. Her investigation will focus on beads in southwestern France from the 16th to 18th centuries.

Diane C. Wright, adjunct professor at Parsons The New School for Design and the Rhode Island School of Design, is the guest curator at the Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) in New York City for a 2012 exhibition which will present the work of the stained glass designer Frederick Wilson (1858–1932),...

Virginia C. Young, a doctoral candidate at West Virginia University in Morgantown, is conducting research on working-class feminism in West Virginia’s glass and pottery industries between about 1930 and 1975. She will study 94 boxes of archival materials of the National Association of Manufacturers...

2010

Dr. Jerzy J. Kunicki-Goldfinger, who took a materials science approach to his subject, intended to publish a book based on his research. It was to offer “a comprehensive introduction to the technological and compositional development of vessel glass in central Europe…It will outline the basic types...

A professor of 19th-century art at Ghent University, Dr. Marjan Sterckx received a grant to assist her research on the designs of Belgian sculptor Yvonne Serruys (1873–1953). Between about 1905 and 1910, Serruys designed models for more than 300 objects to be made in pâte de verre and blown glass...

2009

Dr. Stéphanie Boulogne, who received her Ph.D. in Islam­ic art and archaeology from the Université Paris Sor­bonne (Paris IV), is a research fellow at the Laboratoire d’Archéologie Médiévale in Aix-en-Provence, France, and the Institut Français d’Ar­chéologie du Proche-Orient (IFPO) in Amman,...

G. Eason Eige, who retired as curator at the Andrews Pueblo Pottery & Art Gallery in Albuquerque, received this grant “to unravel the confusion and prejudice surrounding glass produced in Mexico by produc­ing a well-researched and richly illustrated book” that includes more than 1,500...

2008

The Berkshire Glassworks, the subject of Lance Kasparian’s research, specialized in the manufacture of handmade plate and cylinder glass for church windows. He used his Rakow Research Grant to study the firm’s organization and development, its use of local mate­rials, the presence of skilled...

Frances Liardet, who holds degrees from Oxford and Bristol Universities, began her exploration of craft practices by examining skill traditions in an­cient boatbuilding. She describes her work as “an experimental project involving the reproduction of Mediterranean Group I core-formed alabastra. It...

Susan M. Rossi-Wilcox curated Harvard University’s Glass Flowers before retiring in 2007. She was the Glass Art Society Journal editor and served on the GAS Board of Directors. She has been a recipient of the Rakow Research Fellowship, and was a visiting scholar at the Max Plank Institute for the...

2007

Rosa Barovier Mentasti belongs to a Muranese family of glassblowers and designers, going back to medieval age. She studied archaeology and history of ancient arts at the Università degli Studi  in Padua, with a thesis about archaeological glass and the Murano revival in the 19th century....

Dr. Cristina Tonini received a 2007 Rakow Research Grant along with Rosa Barovier Mentasti and Marco Verità, to study Venetian enameled glass of the late 15th and 16th centuries. The three Italian researchers intended to make an iconographic and typological analysis of a wide variety of...

Dr. Valentina Varl is curator at the Pokrajinski Muzej Maribor in Slovenia. In researching glass production in the Pohorje region, she says she wanted to “introduce our pressed glass to the public, show its importance, and discover [its] influences.” Since completing her graduate studies in art...

Dr. Marco Verità received a 2007 Rakow Research Grant along with Rosa Barovier Mentasti and Cristina Tonini, to study Venetian enameled glass of the late 15th and 16th centuries. The three Italian researchers intended to make an iconographic and typological analysis of a wide variety of...

2006

Sarah Jennings received a Rakow Grant in 2006 for the editing and layout of her book, Vessel Glass from Beirut. This volume reported on an extensive collection of glass vessel fragments, dating from 300 B.C. to 1500 A.D., and recovered from three sites. The printing of the volume were...

Deborah Truitt received a Rakow Grant to support her compilation of an index of business records (including accounting, suppliers, customers, and catalogs) of American hollow glass importers between 1700 and 1940. In compiling her database, Truitt searched online catalogs, conduct telephone...

2005

Nina Gray (1956-2013) and Lindsy Parrott of The Neustadt Museum of Tiffany Art in New York City investigated the origin and variety of glass that Tiffany Studios used in leaded glass windows, lamps, and mosaics. Their study was based on the Neustadt Museum’s glass collection, which came from...

Dr. Alok Kumar Kanungo, a postdoctoral fellow at Deccan College in Pune, India, focused on the antiquity of glass in India, based on archaeological, ethnographic, and archival studies. Dr. Kanungo, who recently published his dissertation, Glass Beads in Ancient India: An Ethnoarchaeological...

Ruth D. Nelson, a graduate student in art history at the University of Illinois at Chicago, conducted research on the interior of the Marquette Building, which she describes as “one of the most stunning attractions in Chicago.” It was built in 1894, and the mosaic mural in the lobby’s rotunda is...

Lindsy R. Parrott is the director and curator of The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass. During her 13-year tenure, she has extensively researched Louis C. Tiffany’s leaded glass windows, lamps, and opalescent flat glass. Her exhibitions at The Neustadt include: A Passion for Tiffany...

2004

Olive Jones, a material culture researcher from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, was the recipient of the 2004 grant. Her research employed the records of bottle merchants, as well as those of wholesalers, exporters, and importers of bottled products, to offer a new interpretation of the vocabulary of the...

2003

Nicole Chesney began her undergraduate studies at California College of Arts and Craft and completed her BFA at the Massachusetts College of Art in 1997. In 2000, Chesney earned her master’s degree from the Canberra School of Art in Australia. Awards received include a Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation...

Norman H. Tennent, a Scottish scholar and professor of chemistry of conservation and restoration at the University of Amsterdam, studied old restoration methods to repair vessel glass. Dr. Tennent surveyed the historical development of glass repair materials and to record the long-term behavior of...

Francesca Tolaini, a Ph.D. candidate at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy, conducted research for her dissertation on the book that contains recipes on glassmaking and glass coloring from late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Tolaini has transcribed and analyzed recipes in various...

2002

Ruth Eve Jackson-Tal, a researcher in the Glass Department of the Israel Antiquities Authority, examined new evidence from many excavations in Syro-Palestine and re-evaluate the role of the region as a glass production center during the late Hellenistic period. Jackson-Tal received her M.A. in...

Pavlos Triantafyllidis, an archaeologist in the Greek Ministry of Culture in Rhodes, researched glass technology at the Hellenistic glass factory in Rhodes. Dr. Triantafyllidis received his Ph.D. from the University of Ioannina in 1998. His dissertation focused on glass objects from Minoa on...

2001

John D. Banham researched the develop­ment of glassmaking in northeastern England. Mr. Banham, who lives in County Durham, has 30 years of experience in the social, economic, and environmental development of northeastern Eng­land. Most of that experience was acquired in local government work in...

R. H. Pinder-Wilson studied an important col­lection of Islamic glass fragments in Cairo, Egypt. Mr. Pinder-Wilson, a resident of London, retired as regents’ professor at the University of California at Berkeley in 1984. He also served as director of the British Institute of Afghan Studies in...

2000

Francesca Dell’Acqua, a graduate student at the Scuo­la Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy, prepared her doctoral dissertation on glazed windows in Europe in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The starting point for this research was a study of the ninth- and 12th-century window glass found...

Dr. Jill Turnbull received her doctorate from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1999. The Rakow Grant supported the publication of her dissertation, “The Scottish Glass Industry, 1610­–1750,” in the Monograph Series of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Most of the material in Dr....

1999

Dr. Karen L. Kettering, associate curator of Rus­sian art at the Hillwood Museum in Washington, D.C., worked on a survey of major developments in Russian glass production from the 18th to early 20th centuries, based on objects in the Hillwood col­lection. Dr. Kettering, who received her Ph.D....

Patricia C. Pongracz, at the time a graduate student at Brown University, studied the glass excavated at the Augustinian abbey of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes, Soissons, France (founded 1076). The study of glass from the monastic site of Saint­-Jean-des-Vignes was based on excavations of the Wes­leyan-...

1998

Dr. Thilo Rehren, research scientist at the Deutsches Bergbau-Museum in Bochum, Germa­ny, was awarded the 1998 Rakow Grant for Glass Research for a study of Late Bronze Age (LBA) glassmaking. “The stunning homogeneity of LBA base glass chemistry from Egypt and beyond is a long-known fact,” Dr....

1997

The 1997 Rakow Grant for Glass Research was awarded to Kenneth M. Wilson for the com­pletion of a definitive study of the Mount Wash­ington Glass Works. Mr. Wilson, an author, lecturer, consultant, and glass jewelry maker from Punta Gorda, Florida, has written several books and many articles about...

1995

Henri Reiling, honorary curatorial assistant for the zoological collections of the Utrecht Uni­versity Museum in the Netherlands, studied the 19th-century glass models of invertebrate animals made by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. He holds de­grees in biology and education from the Universi­ty...

1994

W. Patrick McCray, a doctoral candidate majoring in materials science and engineering at the University of Arizona, studied the culture and technology of glassmaking in Renais­sance Venice. Mr. McCray received his M.S. and B.S. in mate­rials science and engineering from the University of...

Dr. Susan Young, an archaeologist and art historian, catalogued and studied glass from the excavation of the medieval castle of Saranda Kolones (about 1196–1222) in Paphos, Cyprus. Director of the Canadian Archaeological Institute at Athens, she received degrees from Pennsyl­vania State University...

1993

Regina Lee Blaszczyk is Professor of Business History and Leadership Chair in the History of Business and Society at the University of Leeds in the UK, and associate editor at the Journal of Design History. She has been a curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, an American...

1992

The 1992 Rakow Grant for Glass Research was awarded to Geneviève Sennequier, curator at the Musée des Antiquités in Rouen, France. The grant was used to complete a doctoral dissertation on the Gallo-Roman glass of the Nor­mandy region of France. Ms. Sennequier’s research was based on approximately...

1991

The Rakow Grant for Glass Research was awarded to Jørgen Hein, curator of the Royal Danish Collections at Rosenborg Palace, Copen­hagen, Denmark for use in completing a catalog of about 250 unpublished glass objects at Rosen­borg Palace and Amalienborg Palace. Sixty percent of these objects...

1990

The 1990 Rakow Grant for Glass Research was awarded to Dr. Virginia Chieffo Raguin, an associate professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. The grant was used in completing The Stained Glass Heritage of America, 1800–1980s, a book com­...

1989

Dr. Julian Henderson, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Oxford University Research Labora­tory for Archaeology and the History of Art, was awarded funds from the Rakow Grant for Glass Research to study and chemically analyze glass fragments from two important Bronze Age and early Iron Age sites...

Professor David Jacoby, a scholar of medieval history and member of the Department of History at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, is affiliated with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. His research topic was the development of the Venetian glass industry between...

1988

Dr. Meredith Lillich, professor at Syracuse University, completed studies for a publication on European stained glass (made before 1700) in upstate New York public collections. Among these works were panels in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass (including panels on permanent loan from...

Martine Newby of London completed a report on the glass finds from the medieval Benedictine monastery of Farfa, near Rome. During the early Middle Ages, Farfa was under the patronage of the Holy Roman emperors, and it became one of the richest and most powerful monasteries in Europe. During seven...

Wang Shixiong of the Shaanxi Provincial Museum, Xian, China studied glass beads excavated in tombs dating from about 1000 B.C. (the Western Zhou dynasty) in Fufeng County and Baoji. These beads were among the earliest examples of glass or glass-related materials found in China. The re­search aimed...

1987

Miriam E. Mucha, special assistant in the American Art Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, received the 1987 Rakow Grant for Glass Research, awarded by The Corning Museum of Glass. Mrs. Mucha's project concerned the method of manufacture of French pressed tablewares produced between 1825...

1986

Jorge Barrera, a French glass scholar, was selected as the first recipient of the Rakow Grant for Glass Research. Mr. Barrera studied the glass discovered in the Cour Napoleon, the courtyard of the Louvre in Paris, during excavations for the new entrance and expanded public service area for...